Posts Tagged ‘Author interviews’


I discovered the books of Chelsea Quinn Yarbro just a few months ago, and have become a great fan of her work. I became acquainted with her through a friend of mine, and I was eager to get an interview with her. Chelsea Quinn Yarbro is a kind, fascinating, and very talented writer. She’s been writing for 44 years, and has penned everything from science fiction, to horror, to westerns, to non-fiction. She is presently the author of 87 published novels, and I am honored to have her. I’ve been reading her Saint-Germaine vampire series, and I strongly recommend it to anyone. However, I’ve found one negative side effect to reading the books of Chelsea Quinn Yarbro: she serves as a great reminder to me of how far I have to go to get as good as she is.

Visit Chelsea Quinn Yarbro at: http://www.chelseaquinnyarbro.net/

Q: You have written so many historical novels. How and why do you choose to write about the eras you do?

A:  In the case of the Saint-Germain novels, I originally set the stories — with the exception of Tempting Fate, which takes place after the historical man was dead — in places the real man had claimed to have been, and expanded from there.  Over the years I’ve developed a chronology for Saint-Germain, Roger, Olivia, Niklos, and Madelaine as well as some notes on what happens to others from his colorful past:  Rowena Saxon in Writ in Blood shows up again in Midnight Harvest, for example. In the case of other historical novels, which includes my two westerns, I chose times that interested me for their ripple effect on their time, or events that so appalled me that I  wanted to explore how they happened.

Q: Which are your favorite historical time eras and why?

A:  This one, because it’s where I live.

Q: You’ve been quoted as saying, “History is horror.” Can you elaborate on that?

A:  Not all history is horrifying, but a lot of it is. I call the Saint-Germain Cycle historical horror novels (and have from the first, meaning from Hotel Transylvania on; the sentimentalized “novel of forbidden love” was the publisher’s idea, which is why I cross it out in every copy I sign) because what people do to people tends to be more barbaric than anything a vampire could do.  Go ahead: compare, say, Stalin with one vampire, or a dozen of them.  Who is the more inhumane?

Q: Of the novels you’ve written, which ones were the most difficult to write, and how did you get through them?

A: Since I’m a character-driven writer, once the characters “come alive” the only way to shut them up is to finish the story; otherwise they linger.  I have two large portions-and-outlines that haven’t sold yet sitting in my head, and I would like to find them a home so they can retire from my thoughts.  It’s my general experience that stories drive themselves once the characters become “real”.  Any book worth its salt is difficult to write — that’s part of the deal.  Some are harder than others, but if they’re easy, the writer is cheating not only the reader, but him/herself as a story-teller.  For me, westerns are fun, but not easy.

Q: How important  do you think historical accuracy is when writing a novel set in a different time era?

A: It depends on the book.  In general I’m a stickler for historical accuracy, but I have done alternate history, like Ariosto, which I find challenging and engaging.

Q: How do you feel about narrative non-fiction?

A: It depends on how well it’s done, and unfortunately much of it is filled with sloppy writing.  When it’s done well, it’s quite intriguing.

Q: How many Saint-Germaine novels are there, and which are your favorites?

A:  There are 24 novels, including the one I just turned in, and 2 collections of shorter fiction.  My favorite book at any time is always my next one.  Collaborations are a bit different, but even they have charm for me.

Q: What do you hope readers come away with from reading your Saint-Germaine novels?

A: The satisfaction of money well-spent.  Anything beyond that is extra.

Q: What is the one thing you think most readers would be surprised to know about the Saint-Germaine novels?

A:  Probably that most of them were written in less than six months, some in less than four months.

Q: What do you think is the most fascinating or peculiar thing about life as a writer?

A:  Making sense of royalty reports.

Q: I’ve read that you have written over eighty novels, and that you release three to four books per year. How do you remain so prolific? And how many hours of writing do you do in the course of an average week?

A:  At present 87 books — novels, collections, non-fiction — and over 80 shorter works are listed on my bibliography; in my 44 years of professional writing, I’ve had five books completed canceled before publication, six completed novels that never sold — or haven’t sold yet — a couple of for-hire ventures that fell apart after my work had been done, and two books that vanished in a puff of smoke when the acquisitions editor left the acquiring publisher.  However my end of publication happens, it happens, I’m glad it does.  My average day goes like this:  up between 7 and 7:30, feed the cats, answer email and such, take a hot bath to get my arthritic joints moving (I’ve had arthritic knees since my 20s), then do writing until 12 or 1, when I stop for lunch, the main meal of my day.  Then I take an hour or so for chores such as shipping, shopping, watering the garden, and get back to work between 3 and 4, break at 5 for the news, come back to the machine either around 7 or 9, depending what’s on tv.  Toward the end of a book, I may go back to work at 10 or 11 and work until 1 or so, and then I get up an hour later than usual.  Sunday I visit friends in the South Bay, and I allow myself one half-day a week.  A couple times a year I have house-guests, and play tourist with my visitors.  I have lunch out a couple of times a month.  There are days when Crumpet, Butterscotch, and Ekaterina the Great, Empress of all the Russias demand more of my time than they usually do, but that’s pretty much it.

Q: Who are your own favorite writers and what are some of your favorite books?

A:  Shakespeare, all else is changeable.

Q: What are some things in a novel that bother you and will cause you to put it down?

A:  Poor grammar and syntax in narration will do it every time.  Dialogue can be a linguistic mess and that doesn’t bother me, but if I have to stop to parse a sentence or deal with a misused word, I am no longer “in” the story, and I quickly lose interest in it.  Obvious story lines and motivation based on stupidity can also turn me off.

Q: What are some things that make it impossible for you to put a book down?

A:  A friend wrote it, it’s not a genre I’m working in at the time and it’s well done, the characters are compelling, it has an unusual perspective or a narrative point-of-view that opens a lot of doors.  Style can also catch my attention. if the storytelling is solid.

Q: Do you outline your novels, or does the plot come to you as you write it?

A:  Yes, I outline, though I often wind up getting rerouted through the story line by the characters on my way to the end.  If the characters and the book isn’t mostly set in my mind, I can’t write it, but once the basic form is there, and the characters are established, I’m ready to go.

Q: Did you have any false illusions when you began life as a novelist, and if so, how have these evolving understandings changed your approach to your craft and the business of writing?

A: All illusions are false by definition.  When I began, I had a pretty good idea of what I was getting into.  Of course my understanding has been evolving, as has every writer’s:  publishing has been evolving, and at the moment more rapidly than in past decades, which certainly changed the business end of writing.  For one thing, advances are down sharply and print-runs are smaller.  Then there’s the whole matter of e-publishing, and who knows how that’s going to shake out.  At least for now, it is reviving the back-list so that mid-list writers like me are not compelled to live in garages or in spare rooms.  For now there is cause for encouragement, which is a nice change.

Q: What makes you laugh?

A: Mark Twain’s essay on “The Awful German Language” is sure to make me laugh.  My three cats.  The rest is timing and my state of mind.

Advertisements

Since beginning my author interviews a few months back, I’ve been paying special attention to other readers, listening for the names of their favorite writers in an attempt to be sure the interviews don’t become confined solely to my own personal tastes. As I’ve listened, the name that I’ve heard more than any other is probably Maeve Binchy. As it so happens, I am also a fan of Maeve’s work, so I decided she’d be a pretty dang good guest for my blog.

I contacted Maeve a few weeks ago (or more accurately, I contacted Christine Green, Maeve’s literary agent) and enquired about an interview. Christine told me she’d talk to Maeve, and within a few days, we got the ball rolling. This quick response was especially impressive to me because I am in the United States, Maeve is in Ireland, and Christine is also in the U.K. Gotta love the internet!

Maeve Binchy is best known for her sense of humor and her take on small-town life in Ireland. Before publishing her first novel Light a Penny Candle in 1982, she worked as a teacher and a journalist at The Irish Times. Since then, she has published over a dozen novels, including Circle of Friends, which was made into a Hollywood movie  in 1995 starring Chris O’Donnell and Minnie Driver. In addition, Maeve has published several short story collections, novellas, plays, and some non-fiction. For more about Maeve and her work, check out her website at: http://www.maevebinchy.com/

Q: Do you remember the moment you decided you wanted to be a writer?

A: Not really: I think I always wanted to be a story-teller.  My writing career started with a letter which was published in Irish Times.  I  became a journalist and worked for the Irish Times for many years and I had a great kind boss  who thought I could do anything and sent me to  write about wars and economics and the Royal Family and gave me a great training. In my own writing, I wanted to be entertaining, comforting, encouraging and the reader’s friend.   I used to be a teacher, so I thought that I could run the world.  I used to be an Agony Aunt so I think I can solve everyone’s problems!

Q: Your novel Circle of Friends was made into a movie in 1995, starring Chris O’Donnell and Minnie Driver. Were you happy with the movie?

A: I was very impressed with the way the screen writer and director brought the story to the screen.  It is a very long book so obviously not everything could be included, but I think they have told my story very well. You get the whole sense of it all. It’s a totally different world — they have to cut out all those pages and pages of internal monologue that I write, and all the brooding and thinking and wondering that I go on with .  One little sentence in a film script says and shows it all.  And I am literally in awe of the detail they go to, to get the places looking just right, and the detail accurate.

Q: Did you meet any of the Circle of Friends cast?

A: I first met Minnie Driver down in Kilkenny, she and Chris O’ Donnell came over and asked me was this meant to be about me and my friends, and I said it was a bit but they were much  far more beautiful and handsome  than we were with the total truth.

I met Minnie’s sister, and Chris O’ Donnell’s parents, there and in Hollywood, and in London and in Dublin.  They were charming everywhere and very easy company.

Q: Outside of writing, what do you love more than anything?

A: The happiest moments of my life are connected with family and friends.  There is a great comfort about being with people who knew you way back when. There is a mental shorthand, and easygoing feeling that life doesn’t have to be explained or defined; we are all in more or less the same boat.  To have a community around you in a changing and unstable world is invaluable and nothing can beat the feeling that there will always be people out for our good.

Q: Is there any particular character or characters of yours that you are especially fond of or attached to?

A: I don’t really have a favourite but I have a number of characters who reappear in the more recent novels.  My father was a lawyer and he warned me never to put a real person in a book so I have not done that. But I do steal little attributes from people and I do enjoy that…

Q: What part of the writing process is the most difficult for you?

A: I have bad arthritis these days and it’s now in my wrists, so this practical aspect is the worst bit for me these days.

Q: Have you ever gotten half way through writing a novel and become so frustrated or discouraged that you couldn’t finish it?

A: Sometimes I do have an idea and a main character and a situation but I am afraid to talk about it in case it all slips away on me and that by talking about it I will believe it’s already done!

 

Q: What do you most hope that people will say about your novels fifty years from now?

A: I guess I’d hope people understand that we only get one life and it will be what we made it to be and there are no short-cuts. Being wealthy doesn’t necessarily make you happy, nor being beautiful or thin or married.  And nobody’s life is ordinary if we know where to look.

Q: Is there anything you really wish you had written but never got around to?

A: Any good de-cluttering manual.  My life and house and study and mind are all full of clutter.  I would love to have researched a way to get rid of it, and maybe some of the good advice I unearthed would have rubbed off on me.

Q: When and where do most of your ideas strike you?

A: I often look at people’s faces in the street: there are stories written there.  Is that man unfaithful?   Does that woman have a secret? Nowhere is dull, nobody is boring.

 Q: Do you believe in love at first sight?

A: Of course! Growing up in Dublin in the 1950s, I was in love with Marlon Brando. I sent fan letters. I wanted him to come to Ireland, to fall in love instantly with our country and with me. We would, of course, marry and live happily ever after.  Fortunately I am very happy in my life these days and I stopped wanting to marry him quite a long time ago.  The fact is, though, that I don’t believe that you fall into someone’s arms and True Love will conquer everything.  It doesn’t.  You both have to work at it a bit and make compromises.

Q: Of all of your novels, which is your favorite, and why?

 A: You always love the book you are writing at this moment so my mind is totally taken up with my next book!  It’s going to be called A Week in Winter and it’s set in a beautiful hotel on the west coast of Ireland.

Q: How many books did you write before you got one published?

A: ‘My First Book’ was the title of a collection of pieces in the Irish Times; and I was already writing short stories for the paper.  Of course, like everyone I got dozens of rejection slips but I am a sunny-minded, optimistic person so I don’t brood about them, that’s the way it goes.

 Q: What do you think is the most important element a good story must have?

A: I think is has to be characters you like and are interested in.  If we are to believe in them we must get to know them.  If you look at people’s faces in airports, cafes, on trains, in the street you can see stories written there.  Is that man afraid his wife is unfaithful?   Does that woman wish she had the courage to start dating again?  It’s written everywhere if you look.

 Q: What would you like to say to aspiring authors?

A: Seriously, it’s very boring, but you must write at least ten pages a week otherwise you’re not writing, you’re only playing around.

P.S. ~ While I was at it, I asked Maeve’s literary agent Christine Green if she would like to do an interview as well. Come back within the next few weeks to learn some fascinating dteails about the life of a literary agent!


I’ve been blathering on this blog for the past year and a half about my own experiences in writing, my own observations about this business, and all the things I have learned along the way. As much fun as I’ve had doing this,  it recently occurred to me that maybe folks would like to hear from some other writers as well. After all, probably the greatest thing I’ve acquired on this journey is the friendship of some very fascinating people. On that line of thought, I’ve decided to interview some of the writers I’ve met, getting their perspectives, experiences, and lessons learned on their paths in this business.

The first person I chose to particpate in this was Kim Williams-Justesen. It was important to me that she get to go first because she’s my personal mentor and I owe her an ocean of thanks. I met Kim in March of 2010. By then, I’d been beating the hell out of the same novel for about two years. I’d read all the how-to books and attended some small workshops, but for all I was learning, the book just wasn’t getting written. When a friend of mine, who was probably tired of hearing my frustrations, mentioned that she knew an author named Kim Williams-Justesen, I was ecstatic and I hassled her till she set up a time and a place for me to meet Kim.

The first time I met Kim Williams-Justesen was in a tiny cubicle in a stuffy office at Broadview University in West Jordan, Utah. We were introduced to each other and after shaking hands, we were left by ourselves to get better acquainted. We looked at each other stupidly for a while but were eventually able to make the empty small-talk of complete strangers. It was awkward. It wasn’t at all how I had it planned out in my head. I’d been certain we were going to get along swimmingly and instead, I was sure this woman hated me. I just knew she thought I was some kind of talent-junkie who thought I was going to ask her to “hook me up” with an agent or something. As I later found out, she thought it was me who hated her. Probably because, by nature, I look annoyed. 😉

I went home disappointed by the meeting and feeling like a bit of a loser. Still, I’d done one thing right that day: before leaving the office, I asked Kim if we could exchange e-mails. I wasn’t sure if this might come across as too invasive, but I was desperate and all alone in the world of writing! This woman was the only person I knew at the time who had any experience in professional writing and being published. After meeting her that first day in the office, I’d concluded that I had to find a way to make her adore me, and ultimately… teach me everything she knew about writing! It took me two weeks to send her my first tentative e-mail, but I was delighted and surprised when she kindly and promptly e-mailed me back. We spent the next several weeks getting a feel for each other in an ongoing e-mail Q and A – mostly about writing-related topics. After a while, an unexpected thing happened: we became friends.

Since that day just over two years ago, Kim has walked me through my first novel, she is the co-author of my second novel, Beautiful Monster, and she is currently giving me the same level of what seems to be endless tolerance and infinite support on my third book. We plan to begin another collaborative effort as soon as I am finished with the project I’m working on now. I’ve been lucky to be a part of Kim’s own writing career as well. Just less than three hours ago, she and I finished the final revisions of The Deepest Blue, a manuscript of hers which is scheduled for release by her publisher in the Fall of 2013.

Kim Williams-Justesen is the author of My Brother the Dog, The Hey! Ranger! series for children, and co-author of the nonfiction self-help book, Love and Loathing with Randi Kreger. Also, her novel My Brother the Dog, is scheduled for re-release in hardcover under the new title, Kiss, Kiss, Bark! in Fall of 2012, and the possibility of a sequel for it is being discussed. Our first collaboration, Beautiful Monster, is currently making the rounds, looking for a home, and Kim is on the brink of finishing a project I’m especially in love with, a novel under the working title of Death Kiss.

She’s been a vital component in my growth as a writer, as well as an instrumental part of my life in ways that go far deeper than fiction. What follows are some questions I asked her about her own experiences as an author. I hope her answers might help you the same way they have helped me.

Kim Williams-Justesen

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

A: I don’t think there was a specific time I said “Oh yeah! I want to be a writer!” I’ve always loved words and writing, so I think I just evolved into doing this.  

Q: What is the first story you remember writing?

A: In third grade I had to write a book report. We went to the library to pick books off the shelves, but I either had read what was there, or I didn’t think it was interesting (boy books, yuck!), so I went home and wrote my own book called “A Pony of My Own” – which was wishful thinking on my part. I even had a pen name – Pearl Bluebonnet. It was about a girl who finds a “stray” pony and talks her mom and dad into letting her keep it. Typical 8-year-old thinking!  

Q: Every writer has his or her own writing process. What is your personal process?

A: My process varies. I used to have a set writing schedule, but I’ve learned to adapt. I have to know the basic structure of the story before I begin – beginning, middle, and most importantly how it ends. From there, I develop the characters and try to learn more about them so I can understand why they do what they do in the story. Then I dive in and start writing. I try to write complete chapters at one sitting, but I’m also finding that grabbing a paragraph here or there is just as effective.  

Q: Where do you do most of your writing?

A: Anywhere I can. Mostly in my bedroom at the small desk in the corner. I will also write at work if things get slow, or in the car, or if I’m waiting in an office or something. I will hear pieces of conversation between characters in my head and I write them down no matter where I am.

Q: Who are your favorite authors?

That’s a long list! Shakespeare, Poe, Paul Zindell, Christopher Moore, Eric Larson, Isaac Asimov, Eudora Welty, William Faulkner, Earnest Hemingway, and a lot of others I can’t think of at the moment!

Q: Which authors would you say have most affected your own writing?

A: I heard Jane Yolen speak at a conference about the mood of a story, and it had a lot of impact on me. I began to think about story differently because of that and I think she helped to change the way I write for the better. Eric Larson writes nonfiction in such a compelling way that it feels like you are part of history. This taught me to pay attention to details in a way that I also believe has strengthened my writing. The writers I worked with while getting my Masters degree also had a huge impact on me.

Q: Which of your own characters is your favorite, and why?

A: I think Donny, the little brother from “My Brother the Dog” is one of my personal favorites. He was so fun to work with, and he makes me laugh every time I reread him.

Q: Which of your own characters is your least favorite, and why?

I dislike Julia, the mother in “The Deepest Blue” because she is based on two real people, neither of whom I’m very fond of.  

Q: Do you believe in muses? Do you have a muse? If so, who or what is your muse?

A: I do believe in muses, and I have many. Some are real, some are only in my head. One of my muses is a nasty woman who is always telling me I can do better, but she inspires me to push harder, even if her methods are not kind. I have actual people in my life who are muses. They inspire me with ideas and they encourage my writing. I value them dearly.  

Q: Which of your books was the most difficult to write and why?

A: “Beautiful Monster” was the most difficult because it caused me to confront some aspects of my own life that were not very pleasant, and that’s really all I want to say about that.

Q: What events in your life do you think lead you to the path of writing?

A: I think that any event which triggers introspection can cause that desire to write. For me, it was simply a love of words and a sense that playing with words was fun. Even when I was in PR and I was writing about obsolete chemical weapons, I enjoyed the challenge of working with the words to serve a purpose.

Q: When you are writing, do you have anyone in specific who you feel you’re writing for?

A: When I’m writing the first draft, I try to focus on story rather than audience. Later, in revision, I focus on who I think the story is aimed at so I can tighten the details and make them appropriate to that audience.

Q: Have you ever had writer’s block? If so, how did you overcome it?

A: Yes – more than once. The first time I had writer’s block it was so severe that I would have full-blown anxiety attacks just sitting down at the computer. I had to overcome it because I was in the middle of my MFA program and I was at risk of not graduating. I overcame it by working with a mentor who tricked me into writing. I started by collecting words, then organizing those words into categories, then playing with the words in interesting combinations, then creating sentences from those combinations, then paragraphs, and in time, I was back to writing without the dread and fear that had frozen me. I use this same technique now when I start feeling stuck.

Q: What are your biggest pet peeves about the books you read?

A: Silly and stupid errors. Things like grammatical mistakes that should have been caught by a good editor. Or ridiculous tag lines that need revising. I also get very peeved when a character does something that is totally out of line with the psychological presentation that the author has created.  

Q: In the course of an average week, how much time do you dedicate to writing?

A: It varies a little, but I typically spend at least 12 hours a week with my butt in the chair working on a book. I will spend other time reading, looking through information for a story I’m working on, or doing things related to writing. For example, if I need to find a specific setting for a scene to take place, but I haven’t been there, I’ll find something close to what I need and go for a visit. This counts as working on writing for me.

Q: How has your writing changed since you wrote your first novel?

A: Oh – wow – it’s like I’m a different writer.  I know so much more about the craft now than I did then. I know so much more about all the aspects of story that I had no idea of at the time I started writing my first book.  I still think that first story idea is solid, but the execution is terrible. I often think about rewriting it because it would be so much better now.

Q: When did you first get published, and what was your experience with that? How did it happen?

A: I got started with publishing when I wrote articles for internet companies like CitySearch. It was great experience learning to compress my language and to meet deadlines. My first book publishing experience was when I coauthored a self-help nonfiction book with another author. Seeing my words in print became an instant addiction. That box of books arrived on my door step and I just wanted to have more!

Q: What was your first book signing like?

A: It was thrilling! My publisher paid for me to attend the Book Expo America convention. It was in Washington, DC that year. I got to walk around and learn more about other publishers, see all the books that were coming out, collect tons of free samples! It was heaven. When it came time to sign, I was so nervous, but it was an absolute thrill. It felt like nothing would ever be better! Of course, other book signings have also been thrilling, but that first one was just awesome. Crazy awesome!

Q: As a writer, what do you think your strengths are?

A: I’m pretty critical of my writing, and so I have a hard time identifying this, but I think I am really good at building a solid story structure, and I’m also good at dialog. I like listening to people, so I think I have a natural ear for how people speak.

Q: And what are your weaknesses?

A: These are like job interview questions!  Haha! Actually, I think one of my weaknesses is the first draft. I get caught up in making things perfect the first time, and that tends to slow me down. I’m also really bad about including sensory detail. I skip over the stuff that can really bring a scene to life, and then I have to go back and add it in during revision – which of course is what revision is for, but I just wish I could remember to do it the first time out.

Q: In writing, what has been your most wonderful moment?

A: I have two – when my box of author copies of my first novel arrived at my door. That was a thrill beyond words. The second one was when someone I was mentoring completed his first novel. I felt almost the same thrill as what I feel when I finish one of my own.

Q: How has the publishing industry changed since you first got published?

A: E-Publishing has become such a huge component in publishing, and that’s really only been the last five years or so. When I first published, that wasn’t even a blip on the radar.  I think it has made some really nice things happen in publishing, but I also think it has opened the door to some terrible, second-rate work getting produced as well.

Q: Where do you see the publishing industry going from here?

A: This is such a time of transition in publishing. I remember being at a conference 15 years ago and a guy said that “Rocket Books” were the wave of the future and would be the death knell of the traditional publishing industry. And now we all say, “What’s a Rocket Book.?” It was pretty much a Kindle or a Nook, just 15 years too early. I have no idea what is going to happen from here. I just know that there will always be a place for a good story, and I want my stories to be part of that future.

Q: What is the best advice you have to offer new writers?

A: Focus on the craft. Love the writing. You can’t control the publishing world, unless you want to self-publish that is a whole different topic. Learn how to write better. Go to conferences, workshops, classes, and focus on becoming as good as you can be. By the way, that’s a never-ending process.

Q: What have you learned about yourself as a result of your experiences in writing?

A: I’ve learned that I can actually write pretty decent stuff at 3 a.m. when I need to. I’ve learned I am stronger because of choosing to do this, but I am more humble, too. I’ve learned that my writing friends are some of the best friends in the world. I’ve learned that I can become very OCD when I’m in the middle of a book, and that isn’t always a good thing.

Q: Who were your mentors?

A: I was blessed to have amazing mentors throughout my writing life. Carol Lynch Williams, who is also a very dear friend; Rick Walton, who taught me that funny is subtle; Tim Wynn-Jones, who taught me to look for interesting detail that benefits a scene or a character; Alison McGhee, who taught me that you need to know a character’s mind so well it becomes your own; MT Anderson, who taught me that voice is something you can learn, and if you can’t learn it you shouldn’t be writing; and the late Norma Fox Mazer, who taught me how to dig deeper into a story and see what’s sleeping beneath.

For more about Kim-Williams-Justesen, check out her website at: http://www.kwjustesen.com/Home_Page.html

And to get some of her books, go to: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/c/kim-williams-justesen

Jared S. Anderson & Kim Williams-Justesen